Women to Watch


By Lisa Bauer

IF YOU FOLLOW CORINDA RAINEYMOORE on Facebook, you’d think she must have a twin. She’s checking in at the Boys & Girls Club, Madison Network of Black Professionals, UpStart entrepreneur program, the Milwaukee Public Library and a family gathering in Chicago—sometimes all in one week.

“I do so much, but it is all related to lifting people up, especially people of color, and changing people’s trajectories,” she says, adding that helping others thrive fuels her activism. “I love learning. I am on this educational journey so that I can help others succeed.”

A community outreach and engagement coordinator with the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Rainey-Moore knows the value of exposure. Growing up poor in inner city Chicago, she was the first from her family to attend college—at UW–Madison—thanks in large part to a high school enrichment program, which even exposed her to a European trip. Since then, she’s traveled across Wisconsin and to Africa through Leadership Wisconsin. She’s won service awards from the Urban League Young Professionals, United Way, Madison College and Madison Black Women Rock.

Rainey-Moore has rocked as a leader. She’s vice president of the Madison Network of Black Professionals, president of the Madison College Community Council of Color, and interim president of the Urban League Young Professionals. She sits on a long list of boards, chairing a cadre of committees. “I see myself as connecting the dots,” she says. “Because I’m in the trenches, I’m talking to so many different people, I can bridge communities and connect people to opportunities.”

As if her plate’s not already full, in 2016 Rainey-Moore will travel to Kazakhstan with Leadership Wisconsin, finish her doctorate in educational leadership, complete the YWomen Lead Series and host the Urban League Young Professionals’ biggest fundraiser. Let’s not forget her plan to address racial disparities in Madison by opening a girls academy.

She’d also like to run for political office. If she does, few in Madison won’t recognize her name and her contributions.




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